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  ..[ ].. > > ( ) ( Department of General military subjec
 


US Redeployment Tests Iraq Security

( ) ( Department of General military subjec


 

24-09-09, 10:01 PM

  : 1

US Redeployment Tests Iraq Security



 

US Redeployment Tests Iraq Security


BAGHDAD As the US army readies to redeploy its combat troops outside Iraqi cities, there are some concerns regarding the ability of Iraqi forces to pass this test and maintain security. "We have a weak government, affected socially and economically since the invasion, that during six years had US troops giving protection and support," Hakimat al-Wishah, a secondary school teacher in Baghdad, told IslamOnline.net on Sunday, June 28.
"Are they prepared for this responsibility?" Under last November's Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA), US troops will redeploy outside urban areas on Tuesday, June 30, leaving the task of security to the Iraqi army and police.
But many have concerned about the ability of the Iraqi army and police to maintain security especially that the country has already been hit by a series of deadly attacks this month, killing more than 100 people.
"We hear from senior government officers that Iraq is passing through a phase of stability but we know that it is untrue with the daily incidents," Jihaish Abdel-Jalil al-Jihaish, a political science teacher at Baghdad University, told IOL.
But US General Ray Odierno, the commander of US-led forces in Iraq, is confident that the Iraqis are ready to take over security operations in the cities.
"I do believe they are ready," he told CNN. "They've been working towards this for a long time."
"I believe this is the time for us to move out of the cities and for them to take ultimate responsibility."
Some say the redeployment will be less dramatic than assumed because the US army can still intervene if Iraqi security forces appeal for help.
The SOFA sets out a tible for a complete US troop withdrawal from Iraq by 2011.
The US invaded Iraq in 2003 to topple the Saddam Hussein regime under the pre**** of possessing weapons of mass destruction, later proven ungrounded.
Scenarios
Wishah, the Baghdad secondary school teacher, believes the redeployment of US combat troops would not be enough to stop attacks.
"There is a huge number of independent fighter groups in Iraq and the US pullout from the streets doesn't mean they are out from Iraq," he said.
"They will remain in Iraq and will remain as an excuse for more violence until their full withdrawal."
Muhammad Najjar, a security expert, foresees one of two possible scenarios.
"One is that fighter groups will rest for a while to see how the government is going to behave after US troops are out of the streets," he told IOL.
"But on other hand, it might be the door's opening for more violence because they might feel more free to act without the US backing security."
A member of an Iraqi resistance group said they would adopt a wait-and-see approach.
"Everything depends on how they are going to behave after US troops pullout," he told IOL on condition of anonymity.
"We expect a worse attitude, and in this case, we don't have another choice but to fight for recognition and respect."
Jihaish, the political science teacher, expects challenges from the Sunni Awakening (Sahwa) Councils and the Mahdi Army of firebrand Shiite leader Muqtada Al-Sadr.
The Mahdi militia had engaged in two bloody battles against US forces before declaring a ceasefire in August 2007.
The Sahwa councils, created and armed by the US in 2006 to fight Al-Qaeda militants, already have troubled relations with the Shiite-led government.
Many Sahwa leaders have been detained by the government on charges of links to militant groups.
"They are two different groups looking for the same power which will result in battles against the government that is being considered by them weak and unable to stand without US protection," says Jihaish.

 

 


 

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